Cowboy Mouth

Vinyl Music Hall Presents

Cowboy Mouth

The Gary Douglas Band

Fri, October 26, 2018

7:00 pm

Vinyl Music Hall

Pensacola, FL

$20.00

This event is all ages

General Admission * Standing Room Only- If Any Seating Is Available, It Will Be On A Strictly First Come-First Serve Basis * Additional $5 Cash Surcharge At The Door For Under 21 * Attendees Under 16 Must Be Accompanied By A Ticketed, Adult Guardian * Posted Times Are Door Times- Events Generally Begin 30-60 Minutes After Doors Open

Cowboy Mouth
Cowboy Mouth
For over two decades, Cowboy Mouth has dished up its unique style of rock & roll gumbo, mixing a rowdy spirit reflective of the band's hometown -- New Orleans -- with the fierce firepower of a group that lives on the road. These Louisiana natives have played more than 2,500 concerts and launched their signature song, "Jenny Says,” into the upper half of the Billboard rock charts. Above all else, they earned a well-deserved rep as a raucous, redemptive, live music experience.

Formed during the glory days of grunge music, Cowboy Mouth forged a different sound from the very start. It’s a sound rooted in rock, punk, blues, and the attitude of the Big Easy, a town known for its week-long parties and swampy, southern vibe. Bandleader Fred LeBlanc, who'd previously sharpened his teeth with the punk band Dash Rip Rock, pulls double-duty as the group's frontman and drummer, leading the charge with his larger-than-life personality and percussive attack. During the band’s early days, record companies warned him against singing and drumming at the same time, claiming that audiences would never go for it... but by the mid-'90s, those same record companies were clamoring to sign the band to a major-label deal.

In other words, in a decade filled with angsty alt-rock, Cowboy Mouth stood out for all the right reasons.

The band released its original music with MCA Records, then Atlantic Records. Once the 2000s kicked into gear, the band released music on its own label, cutting out the middleman and focusing on the biggest thing that's kept Cowboy Mouth afloat since 1990: the audience.

"Cowboy Mouth isn't so much about the people onstage as it is about the feeling in the crowd," says LeBlanc.

The people onstage certainly help, though. Since the band’s inception, LeBlanc has shared that stage with guitarist John Thomas Griffith. Now backed by bandmates Matt Jones on guitar and Brian Broussard on bass, LeBlanc and Griffith have led Cowboy Mouth on a wild, critically-acclaimed ride, selling more than 500,000 albums domestically, playing shows with artists like Bo Diddley (whose bluesy, beat-driven music has always been a big influence on Cowboy Mouth's own sound), and performing in front of more than 9 million fans.

Go!, the band's newest album, is proof that Cowboy Mouth hasn't lost its bite. It's the most collaborative album of the group's career, performed with ferocity by a group of rock & roll veterans who've been there, done that... and can't wait to do it all again. "I'm just a little older, but I ain't dead yet!" LeBlanc sings during the very first song, kicking off a record that's steeped in the ageless energy of the band's live shows.

Cowboy Mouth’s music lives in concert with its loyal fans! Fred’s raw and engaging performance style has played ring leader to the audience for decades.

"Our shows are celebratory, life-affirming experiences," LeBlanc says proudly. "With every show, no matter where it is, we try to turn it into New Orleans during the middle of Mardi Gras. It's an unique live concert experience. It's like a southern gospel revival without the religion."

Over the years, an estimated 9 million people would agree. We hope to see you all out on the road!
The Gary Douglas Band
The Gary Douglas Band
THERE ARE REALLY ONLY TWO KINDS OF MUSIC. THE GARY DOUGLAS BAND DOES THE SECOND KIND.
Music No. 1 aspires to be well crafted, with sophisticated lyrics, nice melodies, maybe some polished orchestral arrangements.

Then there’s rock ‘n’ roll, Music No. 2, which kicks that chair out from under you, cranks up the volume, slams out a beat like punches to the gut and dredges its message from the deepest passions singers and listeners can bear.

Sweeten it from the wells of Americana, country music and blues, and you get the music that drives GARY DOUGLAS. He drank it up in the streets of Brooklyn as a kid, where, in his words, “everybody knew everybody’s business. Everybody was hot-wired about whatever was on their minds.”

It became even more critical when his family moved with him to more placid surroundings on Long Island. There, he recalls, “It became a religion to me, profound and meaningful. Music gave me a way to channel my feelings, whether I understood them or not. I always found an outlet for feelings I couldn’t resolve, figure out or handle by playing music. It was indispensable.”

Nothing unusual there–for millions of kids around the world, rock ‘n’ roll is an essential rite of passage. But what happens when the passage is completed? Usually, they settle down, get a job … and start listening to Music No. 1 instead.

That’s not exactly what happened with DOUGLAS. He played in bands all the way through college and beyond. Then, in his words, “I had to make a living.” So he hung up his shingle and became a lawyer — a rock ‘n’ roll lawyer, actually.

“I’d walk into court with my suit on and my hair long below my shoulders,” he recalls. “I always fought for the little guy. Judges hated me because I hated authority. I was unorthodox and unconventional — and successful.”

And also, he adds, “completely unfulfilled. I kept telling myself, ‘I should be fucking happy but I’m not.’ Something was missing. It was always this.”

“This” was the rock ‘n’ roll, its whiff of danger and ability to mission past comfort zones toward extremes. “It’s that feeling you get when you’re listening to the lyrics of a really great Springsteen song and it’s like, ‘Fuck, yeah! Thank God somebody out there feels like I do.'”

See, DOUGLAS never let go of that music that gave meaning to his life. He never sank into the easy chair of Music No. 1. Maybe it’s because for all that he achieved as an “adult,” he remained a person governed as much by emotion as ideas. His peers sublimated those feelings or forgot they’d ever had them. Not DOUGLAS. He always kept a guitar in view at home, kind of like a talisman just waiting to be picked up.

Finally, one day, DOUGLAS did pick it up. And everything changed. His chops came back. His singing voice toughened to the point it could convey everything that he had to express — ecstasy, heartbreak and all points between — at full power and all night long.

Just as important, new songs started coming together. “Writing became my catharsis,” he says. “I might not even feel like I’m in the mood to write, but I’ll go to the piano or guitar and if I’m lucky I’ll channel something I can put into a song. Sometimes it’s a good feeling; more often it’s uncomfortable. But in the end I’ll feel better and I’ll have something I can share with the world.”

Backed by a ferocious new band, DOUGLAS took to the road. They opened on a 28-city “Guitar Gods” tour that featured Yngwie Malmsteen, Bumblefoot from Guns N’ Roses, Gary Hoey and other monster pickers. When back in New York, they tightened further through local club gigs. And there, DOUGLAS felt he had found again what he was looking for.

You can feel that magic on KEEPIN’ FAITH. Finished in the spring of 2015 and available now, the album taps into the energy that empowered Springsteen, Seger and other classic rockers. The urgency of “My Desire,” restless summons to seek a better life “Out on the Highway,” explosive anger of “Lord I Try,” screaming release of “Stop Bringing Me Down,” broken romance of “Goodbye Marie” — every shred of feeling throughout KEEPIN’ FAITH comes straight from the now liberated heart of GARY DOUGLAS.

Of course he had help on this mission, from the flawless support of THE GARY DOUGLAS BAND (guitarists Jeremy Goldsmith and Mark Marshall, keyboardist Scott Chasolen, bassist Dan Asher, drummer Stefano Baldasseroni, horn player Nick Biello and backup vocalists Yula Beeri and Clara Lofaro.

Producer Anthony Resta’s (Elton John, Needtobreathe, Collective Soul, Guster, Perry Farrell, Nuno Bettencourt, Shawn Mullins, Sarah Evans) creative input was also critical. “If I sing it some way but he knows I’m wrong, he has a great way of getting you to see the light,” DOUGLAS explains. “And I would go, Yeah! Got it!’ Next time I write a song, there’s not gonna be anything extraneous to it, thanks to what I’ve learned from working with Anthony.”

This is music that could tempt the sedate back into the fire of Music No. 2. The hooks, the blazing guitar solos, and muscle of the old-school Hammond organ, above all the redemptive power of GARY DOUGLAS, tell a story that won’t be denied.

Maybe it’ll change a few lives too. Just ask GARY.

“We played this club two nights ago in a small venue where the whole place was jumping. It was fucking awesome. I don’t need to be a superstar. I don’t need to play Madison Square Garden — although,” he adds, with a smile, “I wouldn’t turn it down. But when it’s right, when the place is packed and rocking, that’s it. That’s all I want.

I always feel best at these clubs where people the whole place is jumping. When we have those nights, that’s it. That’s what it’s about for me.”

Sometimes that’s all any of us need.



THE GARY DOUGLAS BAND
Gary Douglas (Guitar/Lead Vocals)
Jeremy Goldsmith (Electric Guitar)
Nicolas Biello (Reeds and Keys)
Dan Asher (Bass)
Tom Curiano (Drums)
Sebastien Ammann (Keys)
Jessica Antonette (Backing Vocals)

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Venue Information:
Vinyl Music Hall
2 S. Palafox St.
Pensacola, FL, 35202
http://vinylmusichall.com/